India

Sydney students make history in India

exchange students in India

The University of Sydney's first ever group of exchange students in India

Story by Richard North.

A group of 15 Sydney students is spending three weeks in Mumbai and Bangalore as part of the University's first mobility agreement with India.

They are studying at the Tata Institute of Social Sciences in Mumbai (TISS) and the Institute for Social and Economic Change in Bangalore on a field school program looking at the political economy of development and environmental management in India.

"The students are gaining an insight into the vast challenges faced by one of the most important nations in the 21st century," said Dr Elizabeth Hill from the Department of Political Economy, one of the study conveners who is accompanying the students.

Her fellow convener, Associate Professor Bill Pritchard from the School of Geosciences, added: "The program offers students the opportunity to develop cultural competency and familiarity with an important developing economy with which the University is building important partnerships."

The field school program is jointly administered by the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences and the Faculty of Science. The 15 Sydney students will take part in an intensive program of classes and field visits.

In return, two master's students from TISS will enrol in units of study offered through the Master of Human Rights and Democratisation at Sydney later this year.

Professor Duncan Ivison, Dean of Arts and Social Sciences, said: "We need to be creative in establishing models for mobility with our Indian partners and this agreement provides a great short-term opportunity for our students."

Professor Ivison signed the exchange agreement during a University of Sydney delegation to India last year.

He added: "We hope it will be the start of a number of mobility options to encourage our students to choose India as an exchange destination, given the announcement that India is now included in the New Colombo Plan scholarships."

University looks to build mobility opportunities with India

Jawaharlal Nehru University

Professor Duncan Ivison and Dr Elizabeth Hill (far right) with Professor Archie Johnston and Professor Joseph Davis at JNU in Delhi

The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences is directly involved in the University of Sydney's efforts to build on the growing rapport between India and Australia by establishing new opportunities for staff and student mobility between the two countries.

As Narendra Modi arrived in Australia for the first visit by an Indian prime minister since 1986, fifteen researchers from seven University of Sydney faculties were visiting India to develop links with some of the country's leading institutions.

Four faculties took part in an all day workshop at Jawaharlal Nehru University, where Sydney researchers gave seminars and engaged with research students.

Professor Duncan Ivison, the Dean of Arts and Social Sciences, said: "There is plenty of scope for collaborative activities including joint research and the exchange of staff and research students, and plenty of synergy for productive academic discourse."

Two agreements which will facilitate mobility between the University and India are under negotiation, and Professor Ivison will this week sign a new agreement with the Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai.

Under the terms of the agreement, Associate Professor Bill Pritchard and Dr Elizabeth Hill will take a group of 15 students for a three-week field school to India. In return, two TISS master's students will travel to Sydney to take units of study in the Master of Human Rights and Democratisation and the Master of Development Studies.

Professor Ivison said: "We need to be creative in establishing models for mobility with our Indian partners and this agreement provides a great short-term opportunity for our students.

"We hope that it will be the start of a number of mobility options to encourage our students to choose India as an exchange destination, given the announcement that India is now included in the New Colombo Plan scholarships."